Gilbert Harding

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[[Round Britain Quiz]]
[[Round Britain Quiz]]
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[[Talk Yourself Out of This]]
[[Twenty Questions]]
[[Twenty Questions]]
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[[What's My Line?]] (host for one show only, then panellist)
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[[What's My Line?]] (host for one show only, then regular panellist)
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[[Who Said That?]] (regular panellist, then host)
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== Biography ==
== Biography ==
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Grumpy journalist and occasional actor who was both loved and loathed in equal measure in the same way that, say, [[Anne Robinson]] is today. Through appearances on panel games such as [[What's My Line?]], millions of viewers tuned in to see his outbursts as he was frequently overtly rude to hosts, guests, panellists and even his producers.
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Grumpy journalist, occasional actor and former policeman who was both loved and loathed in equal measure in the same way that, say, [[Anne Robinson]] is today. Through appearances on panel games such as [[What's My Line?]], millions of viewers tuned in to see his outbursts as he was frequently overtly rude to hosts, guests, panellists and even his producers.
In 1960, he gave an emotional interview on ''Face to Face'', where - in tears - he openly declared how much he hated being a TV celebrity for no good reason. He died of a heart attack two months later.
In 1960, he gave an emotional interview on ''Face to Face'', where - in tears - he openly declared how much he hated being a TV celebrity for no good reason. He died of a heart attack two months later.
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His first job with the BBC was working in the BBC Monitoring service (which still exists) during WW2 - the service was set up to monitor foreign radio broadcasts for anything of interest, and Harding's job was to prepare a daily digest for the benefit of the War Office.  
His first job with the BBC was working in the BBC Monitoring service (which still exists) during WW2 - the service was set up to monitor foreign radio broadcasts for anything of interest, and Harding's job was to prepare a daily digest for the benefit of the War Office.  
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He had to be sacked by the [[Twenty Questions]] producer, [[Ian Messiter]], after he was drunk on the show.  
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He was thrown off shows twice for being drunk; once from an edition of [[One Minute Please]] by [[Roy Plomley]], and once as host of [[Twenty Questions]] by producer [[Ian Messiter]].  
His homosexuality was not revealed during his lifetime (particularly as such a thing was illegal in those days) though he hinted at it in his autobiography by alluding to "other reasons [apart from then being in his mid-40s] that, so far as I can see, will keep me from marrying".  
His homosexuality was not revealed during his lifetime (particularly as such a thing was illegal in those days) though he hinted at it in his autobiography by alluding to "other reasons [apart from then being in his mid-40s] that, so far as I can see, will keep me from marrying".  
[[Category:People|Harding, Gilbert]]
[[Category:People|Harding, Gilbert]]

Current revision as of 14:57, 19 September 2020

Image:Gilbert_harding_bw_headshot.jpg

Shows

Ask Your Dad (pilot)

The Brains Trust

False Evidence

One Minute Please (regular guest)

Question-Masters Club (panellist)

Round Britain Quiz

Talk Yourself Out of This

Twenty Questions

What's My Line? (host for one show only, then regular panellist)

Who Said That? (regular panellist, then host)

Biography

Grumpy journalist, occasional actor and former policeman who was both loved and loathed in equal measure in the same way that, say, Anne Robinson is today. Through appearances on panel games such as What's My Line?, millions of viewers tuned in to see his outbursts as he was frequently overtly rude to hosts, guests, panellists and even his producers.

In 1960, he gave an emotional interview on Face to Face, where - in tears - he openly declared how much he hated being a TV celebrity for no good reason. He died of a heart attack two months later.

Trivia

His first job with the BBC was working in the BBC Monitoring service (which still exists) during WW2 - the service was set up to monitor foreign radio broadcasts for anything of interest, and Harding's job was to prepare a daily digest for the benefit of the War Office.

He was thrown off shows twice for being drunk; once from an edition of One Minute Please by Roy Plomley, and once as host of Twenty Questions by producer Ian Messiter.

His homosexuality was not revealed during his lifetime (particularly as such a thing was illegal in those days) though he hinted at it in his autobiography by alluding to "other reasons [apart from then being in his mid-40s] that, so far as I can see, will keep me from marrying".

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