Caught in the Act

(Undo revision 74605 by Tsales (Talk))
 
(13 intermediate revisions not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
<div class="box">
<div class="box">
 +
== Host ==
== Host ==
Line 6: Line 7:
== Broadcast ==
== Broadcast ==
-
BBC 1, 1992
+
Action Time for BBC1, 10 January to 27 March 1992 (10 episodes in 1 series)
</div>
</div>
 +
== Synopsis ==
== Synopsis ==
Line 16: Line 18:
Particularly noted for its highly irritating use of comedy sound effects.
Particularly noted for its highly irritating use of comedy sound effects.
 +
<!-- Source material to work into the main article at a later date:
 +
THE CONCEPT: Every so often a broadcaster stumbles across a winning
 +
concept that everyone then decides to shamelessly rip-off, and in
 +
the early nineties this was the camcorder cock-up show. Although
 +
You've Been Framed was the first show on telly to consist of home
 +
videos and nothing but, it only ran as specials for the first year
 +
and the first regular weekly series devoted to them was Chris
 +
Tarrant's Secret Video Show on Sky One. But nobody watched that,
 +
because it was on Sky One, and by 1992 Beadle had the market sewn
 +
up. Then the Beeb decided they wanted to muscle in.
 +
THE HYPE: The promise of some more grandmothers falling arse over
 +
tit was enough to get most viewers excited, because You've Been
 +
Framed was such a smash hit, but for what it's worth there were a
 +
few innovations. The show was produced by Action Time, who also made
 +
variants on the format in umpteen European countries, so they had
 +
hundreds of foreign clips on tap, and there was also a game show
 +
element where the provider of the best clip could win a holiday
 +
somewhere.
 +
 +
THE FIRST SHOW: Broadcast on Friday 10th January 1992, Caught In The
 +
Act was presented by rising star Shane Richie. He was joined by an
 +
army of "foreign correspondents" on a screen who Shane would banter
 +
with and who would introduce clips from their own nations, and
 +
various members of the public – stood behind monitors with stills of
 +
their clips on – who were aiming to win the big prize. There was
 +
also about half a dozen clips when they weren't busy talking rubbish.
 +
 +
THE FIRST CRACKS: Caught In The Act was Shane Richie's first big
 +
break on telly, and it's fair to say that most people found his
 +
rather boisterous Brian-Conley's-little-brother-esque stage presence
 +
something of an acquired taste, as he shouted all his lines, laughed
 +
at his own jokes and bullied the hapless punters. Richie dominated
 +
the show from beginning to end, with his excruciating banter with
 +
the "foreign correspondents" going on for ages, as did the
 +
competition section which was just a boring waste of time. When the
 +
clips finally turned up, most of them were rubbish, and worse still,
 +
the producers clearly decided they weren't funny enough on their
 +
own, so they were all overdubbed by bloody irritating comedy sound
 +
effects.
 +
 +
THE DEPARTURE: There was no departure on this show, or any
 +
rescheduling, because unlike every other show we've detailed so far
 +
in this feature – er, apart from the Big Night, if Brucie's looking
 +
in – it was actually a huge hit. The first show pulled in thirteen
 +
million viewers, and throughout the run never dropped below ten
 +
million, which illustrates how much people wanted to see this sort
 +
of thing. But if the ratings were huge, the critical acclaim
 +
certainly wasn't, with the world and his wife appalled by its vulgar
 +
presentation, crappy format and shameless plagiarism of an ITV
 +
concept.
 +
 +
THE END: It all meant that, come the tenth and final show, while the
 +
ratings would have justified another series, all the papers were
 +
pondering whether the Beeb would actually have the balls to
 +
recommission this derivative rubbish. It just didn't seem the sort
 +
of show the BBC should be making, especially because it was all
 +
being done on other channels anyway. Eventually, they decided not to
 +
give the go-ahead to a second series and simply hoped everyone would
 +
forget about it – deciding the ratings boost was less important than
 +
the loss of credibility.
 +
 +
THE POST-MORTEM: Of course, the pitch for Caught In The Act could be
 +
summed up in two sentences – "You've Been Framed is popular. Let's
 +
just rip that off." Sadly they did so with as little effort as
 +
possible, and indeed many critics were amazed to see that a series
 +
fronted by Jeremy Beadle was actually the quality option. It wasn't
 +
just Richie's rather overbearing presentation that did for it,
 +
though, it was the dodgy format that interspersed the clips with
 +
endless tedious chat, and the crappy sound effects were the icing on
 +
a shit-tasting cake.
 +
 +
THE AFTERMATH: Caught In The Act was one of a series of ropey light
 +
entertainment shows a demoralised BBC Variety department were
 +
churning out in the early nineties, alongside Tarby's dating pilot
 +
Old Flames (which suffered the indignity of the BBC announcing "on
 +
reflection, it is not a programme the BBC1 controller feels he would
 +
be proud to have on his channel"), Bobby Davro's archaic Rock With
 +
Laughter and Marti Caine's final awful shows Joker In The Pack and
 +
Your Best Shot. This sort of thing could never last in the Birt-era
 +
BBC and the Corporation decided this type of show was best left to
 +
ITV, with only Big Break managing to cling on for a few more years.
 +
Meanwhile Shane Richie went off to do Run The Risk and, a few years
 +
later, quit the Beeb complaining that they were only giving him
 +
kids' shows. Caught In The Act did live on, though, as some of the
 +
clips were recycled on a couple of Beeb clip shows in the following
 +
few years, with those telltale sound effects giving the game away.
 +
 +
THE VERDICT: Shit from start to finish, Caught In The Act could well
 +
be the worst programme we've covered in this feature, being a
 +
shameless and appallingly produced rip-off of a format that the Beeb
 +
shouldn't have been going anywhere near in the first place. It
 +
serves as a stark reminder of just how poor the BBC's light
 +
entertainment output was in the early nineties, and its axing is
 +
perhaps the only thing we should thank John Birt for. But ten
 +
million people watched every episode! Truly, another world.
 +
-->
== Inventor ==
== Inventor ==
Names have been removed to protect the guilty.
Names have been removed to protect the guilty.
-
[[Category:Unclassified]]
+
== Videos ==
 +
 
 +
<div class="video"><object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/uf2U2ACKWaw?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/uf2U2ACKWaw?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object><br/>''Here's a full episode that you'd rather forget than remember.''</div>
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Variety]]
 +
[[Category:Action Time Productions]]

Current revision as of 21:31, 8 November 2018

Contents

Host

Shane Richie

Broadcast

Action Time for BBC1, 10 January to 27 March 1992 (10 episodes in 1 series)

Synopsis

The BBC's "me-too!" answer to ITV's vastly successful You've Been Framed!, this never really took off.

People sent in their home videos, people representing nine of the videos faced off in three semi-finals of sorts with the audience voting on their favourite. They then, we think, voted on an ultimate winner from the three heats with a prize going to the winner.

Particularly noted for its highly irritating use of comedy sound effects.

Inventor

Names have been removed to protect the guilty.

Videos


Here's a full episode that you'd rather forget than remember.

Feedback

To correct something on this page or post an addition, please complete this form and press "Send":
If you are asking us a question, please read our contact us page and FAQ first.

Name: E-mail:   
A Labyrinth Games site.
Design by Thomas.
Printable version
Editors: Log in