Derek Hobson (1983-4)

Chris Donat (1990)

Steve Jones (1991-3)

Paul Ross (1995-6)


Nick Jackson (1990-1)
David Hopewell (1993)
Charles Foster (1995-6)


Thames for Channel 4, 12 January 1983 to 2 July 1984 (25 episodes in 2 series)

Reg Grundy Productions and TVS for ITV, 3 September 1990 to 20 December 1991 (90 episodes in 2 series)

Reg Grundy Productions and Meridian for ITV, 22 February to 9 April 1993 (35 episodes in 1 series)

Action Time in association with Columbia Tristar Television and KingWorld Productions for Sky One, 24 July 1995 to 30 December 1996


"The quiz where you get the answers first."
"What is Hitman?"

Ah, Jeopardy. It means risk, you know. This quiz's main attraction is that you get the answers and the correct answer is actually a question, such as:

"A gameshow which has been presented by Derek Hobson, Chris Donat, Steve Jones and Paul Ross."
"What is Jeopardy?"

In reality, this is a rubbish idea. Why not just ask "Which gameshow has been hosted by Derek Hobson, Chris Donat, Steve Jones and Paul Ross?" They might think they're being different and clever. Instead it's just weak, really. If you're going to change the concept of a quiz surely you should do it radically and not just word the questions (answers) a little bit differently? Still, the Americans go overboard for this kind of thing. Ah well.

Three people played three rounds of quizzes to determine the champion. Each round would have six categories, each with five questions (answers) of varying difficulty and points value. Whoever got the last question (answer) right gets to choose next and they will continue until all the answers (questions - do you see how tedious this is yet?) have been used up. Get one right - win the points! Get one wrong - lose the points! Excellent!

And it's double points for round two. Yay. And it's called Double Jeopardy which will please fans of mediocre action thrillers. Unlike the rich US broadcasters, their poor impoverished UK colleagues couldn't afford any decent amounts of cash so points were used instead, which took away most of the "my word, they've just lost $2,000 on a wrong answer" shock that the US show admittedly has. In the Steve Jones version, daily winners got £500, or £3000 for five wins in a row with the biggest winners coming back to play Master Jeopardy for a holiday to Mauritius.

Excitingly, people don't know each other's scores and a few of the questions are (fanfare) Daily Doubles which were both daily and double (possibly) which players could bet as many points as they liked on a single question which would include sound and/or video and a question (answer) based on that clip. Major highlight that.

Finally Final Jeopardy where people bet all, some, none or less of their winnings on one final question (answer) in order to win. Of course this involved a bit of intrigue as they didn't know each others scores and how much they bet wasn't revealed until after the questions had been written down. Shockingly, the person with the most points won a small amount of cash and the right to play next time.

Still, one nice talking point was the way the lights on the contestants' buzzers would gradually turn off indicating how much time they had to give a response. That's about as exciting as it got, really.


Based on the Merv Griffin show in the US.

Mitch Nelson observes:

It might be interesting to note why Jeopardy is the way it is: It was the first quiz show after the 1950s US quiz show scandals where contestants were secretly given answers to the questions. So NBC created a big sensation with mysterious promos revealing that a new game show would again be giving contestants the answers to the questions. It was a deviously clever idea at the time, even if it seems like an unnecessary gimmick now.

Theme music

The ITV version used a strange variation on the original US "Think!" theme (famously composed by Merv Griffin as "A Time for Tony", a lullaby for his son). It's the same tune but with a couple of notes swapped around. The think music for Final Jeopardy was completely different.


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